Coffee

Thirsty Thursday: Try the New Kumquatte

Written on January 30, 2014 at 9:00 am , by

The baristas at Treehaus (one of our staff’s favorite coffee shops) are at it again! If you thought the Bacon Latte was unheard of, just wait until you try Director of Coffee, Tanner Jacobsen’s, newest creation: The Spiced Kumquatte. Tag lined as “A Creamsicle trapped in a latte,” this fusion of kumquat, mulling spices and vanilla will change the way you think about flavored lattes forever.

 

 

Jacobsen has put hours of thought and effort into each element of this drink, and it definitely shows. First, he combines fresh kumquats with mulling spices and reduces the liquid into a simple syrup. Then, he adds the syrup to espresso, and pours in steamed milk that has been infused with orange zest and vanilla (being the competitive latte artist that he is, you can always expect a beautiful design). He garnishes his caffeinated creation with a fresh kumquat slice that’s been soaking in the kumquat syrup, which only gets more potent and delicious over time.

 

Jacobsen recommends that you eat your kumquat garnish with a swig of the latte, as the the flavor profiles of the two go hand in hand. After nibbling, I took my first pure sip of the latte and I could tell this was going to be an enjoyable experience. Right when the drink hits your tongue, you can taste the strong flavors of espresso and spices. Only as you begin to swallow does a clean  flavor of orange hit you. The drink is both refreshing and comforting, as the mild orange flavor keeps it light while the mulling spices remind you that it’s still winter. This drink truly is a Creamsicle trapped in a latte, or as Jacobsen personally describes it, “like eating the outside layer of a Creamsicle.” At $5 plus tax for 8 ounces, Jacobsen has successfully created the most expensive specialty coffee drink in NYC (a fact in which he takes pride).

 

 

Even the handmade sign proves Jacobsen’s dedication to his line of work. But don’t wait around to get your hands on one–this latte will only be available until he dreams up something crazier. Which–judging by his creativity–will be very soon (I got a hint about a $12 frappucino for the summer…would you buy it?).

 

 

Related Links

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French Press: Is It Worth It?

Written on October 26, 2013 at 12:00 pm , by

Whether you’re out for brunch or enjoying a lazy Sunday at home with friends, the French press has made its way to coffee tables and counters across America. But, is it really worth $20? Read on to see why we say: YES!

You can be your own barista

A French press uses water that’s at the boiling point (a temperature many electric machines can’t reach), which extracts more flavor from the coffee. Plus, you can customize how light or dark your joe turns out simply by adjusting the time the grounds steep.

 

You can take it anywhere

Without pesky plugs and not-so-eco-friendly filters in your way, this baby can easily travel with you on a camping trip or to a hotel — or it can sit on your desk so you don’t waste a single second between refills!

 

It’s not just for coffee!

Use a French press to brew loose leaf tea, make vinaigrettes (let herbs steep in the vinaigrette for a few hours, then plunge to strain) — or even press the lumps out of gravy!

 

Written by Lambeth Hochwald; Photography by David Lewis Taylor

 

Related Links

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How To Make Cold Brew Coffee

Written on July 25, 2013 at 9:00 am , by

I drink iced coffee all yearlong, even when there’s snow on the ground. But buying iced coffee on the daily can get expensive, so I’ve taken to making my own coffee–cold brew, to be specific. So what the heck is cold-brew coffee, anyway? Well folks, pay attention, because I’m about to show you the way. (Oh, and since you don’t need electricity for this method, you can thank me the next time the power goes out and you can still get your caffeine fix!)

How to make cold brew coffee


So what’s the difference?

Cold-brew coffee is made by steeping coarsely ground coffee beans in room temperature or cold (ie. no heat here!) water over a long period of time and straining the liquid to create a concentrate. As no heat is applied, the bitter flavor components of the bean are not released, producing a less astringent and less acidic coffee that some even describe as sweet.

 

How do you make it?

 

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