Technique

The Ultimate Scrambled Eggs

Written on January 28, 2014 at 10:58 am , by

 

In our brand new March issue of Every Day with Rachael Ray, our Food Editor, Katie Barreira goes on a culinary journey to discover the ultimate recipe for scrambled eggs. She consults 12 of the world’s most renowned chefs for the best advice, from how high to heat the pan, to the perfect scrambling technique. Here are their results:

 

Wally Joe (chef, partner and general manager of ACRE restaurant in Memphis, Tennessee)

In an 8-inch nonstick pan, melt ½ tbsp. butter over medium-low heat. Crack 3 eggs into the pan and wait for them to set just slightly. Season with salt and pepper, then stir the eggs with a silicone spatula until they’re soft, creamy and not entirely cooked through, about 2 minutes.

 

Tom Colicchio (chef/owner of Craft restaurants, Heritage Steak and ’wichcraft, as well as the executive chef of Topping Rose House in Bridgehampton, New York)

In a bowl, whisk 3 large eggs until foamy. In a round-bottomed chef’s pan, melt about 2 tbsp. butter over medium-low heat.  Add the eggs and whisk constantly until they start to cook, then switch to a silicone spatula. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, then remove from heat. Add a pat of butter and season with salt and pepper.

 

Michael Ruhlman (author, whose food reference books include The Elements of Cooking and Ruhlman’s Twenty. The second of his single-subject technique-focused cookbooks, Egg, comes out in April)

In a bowl, use a whisk, handheld mixer or immersion blender to whip 4 eggs until uniformly mixed and pale yellow in color. In a double boiler, melt 1 tbsp. butter. Add the eggs and ¼ to ½ tsp. salt. Using a silicone spatula, stir gently and continuously for 30 seconds. Then stir every few seconds until the first curds form, about 1 minute. Lift and fold the curds into the liquid egg in the bottom of the pan. Continue to fold and stir until the eggs are about two-thirds cooked, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove the top pan and stir until the curds appear to be sauced by the runny egg.

 

Anne Burrell (host of Worst Cooks in America on Food Network and is a best-selling author. Her second cookbook, Own Your Kitchen, was published in 2013)

In a bowl, using a fork, beat 4 eggs with 4 tsp. water and a healthy pinch of salt until it’s a homogeneous mixture. In a nonstick skillet, heat 2 tsp. EVOO over medium-low heat. Add the eggs and cook slowly, stirring occasionally with a silicone spatula. Cook until eggs are no longer runny but still really soft.

 

Linton Hopkins (chef/owner of Restaurant Eugene and Holeman & Finch in Atlanta)

In a bowl, whisk 4 eggs with an honest pinch of salt. Add 2 tbsp. butter to a cold 8-inch nonstick skillet. Cook over medium-high heat until the butter foams but doesn’t brown, about 1 minute. Add the eggs and, using a wooden spatula, gently stir the eggs for about 30 seconds, making sure to scrape the edges and the bottom of the pan; this will ensure that the eggs do not cook too quickly from direct contact with the hot skillet. Then gently fold the eggs, creating big, soft curds. When the eggs are halfway cooked, about 1 minute, turn off the heat (this will prevent the eggs from overcooking and keep them moist), and continue folding until eggs are done to your liking. The total cook time should be 2 to 3 minutes.

 

Marc Murphy (chef-owner of Benchmarc Restaurants, which include Kingside, Landmarc and Ditch Plains in New York City, and he has appeared regularly as a judge on Chopped, Iron Chef America and other culinary shows)

In a bowl, season 6 eggs with 1 tsp. salt, ½ tsp. pepper and a sprinkle of fresh Parmesan cheese. Whisk until the whites and yolks are just blended. In a nonstick skillet, heat 2 tbsp. butter over low. Add the eggs to the skillet and, using a silicone spatula continuously stir eggs until just set, 4 to 6 minutes. About 1 minute before eggs are done, remove from heat so they don’t get too dry, and keep stirring for about 20 seconds.

 

Gordon Ramsay (Michelin-starred chef and owner of restaurants around the globe. He has five top-rated television shows that air in more than 200 countries and is the author of 27 books, including his autobiography, Roasting in Hell’s Kitchen)

Curious how the tough-talking Ramsay whips up his perfect scrambled eggs? Watch him in action right here.

 

Rachael Ray

Watch how our magazine’s leading lady scrambles up her flavor-packed eggs!

 

Michael Mina (award-winning chef and founder of the Mina Group, which has more than 20 restaurants across the United States)

In a bowl, whisk together 8 eggs. Add the eggs to the top of a double boiler set over boiling water. Use a silicone spatula to gently stir the eggs. Don’t be too aggressive—you want to let the eggs form into small curds as they cook. (You can add all sorts of fun ingredients during this stage, such as crème fraïche, chives, cheese, etc.). Cook the eggs until they’re soft and very moist, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and season with sea salt and pepper.

 

Frank McMahon (chef of Hank’s Seafood Restaurant in Charleston, South Carolina)

In a bowl, whisk 6 eggs with a pinch of salt and pepper. In a 12-inch nonstick skillet, combine 2 tbsp. unsalted butter and 2 or 3 oz. whole milk over medium heat. Bring the milk mixture to a boil and immediately add the eggs, stirring to combine. As the eggs begin to set, use a silicone spatula to gently push the mixture back and forth using a snowplow-like motion to form fluffy egg mounds. Just before the eggs are completely set, remove the skillet from the heat. (The eggs will continue to cook off the heat.)

 

 Elizabeth Falkner (James Beard Award–nominee and executive chef at Corvo Bianco in New York City. Her second cookbook, Cooking Off the Clock, was published in 2012)

In a bowl, whisk 4 eggs, a pinch salt and 2 tbsp. heavy cream. Heat an 8- or 10-inch nonstick skillet over high for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add 1 tbsp. butter and immediately turn the heat down to low. Add the eggs to the skillet and cook, stirring with a silicone spatula for 15 to 20 seconds. Add 1 tbsp. butter, a few cranks of pepper and another pinch salt. Continue to cook for about 20 seconds, until the eggs are still runny, but are setting up on the edges. Remove from the heat and stir the eggs for another few seconds.

 

Ludo Lefebvre (chef and owner of awarding-winning restaurant Trois Mec in Los Angeles)

In a bowl, beat 4 eggs. Season with salt and pepper. In a small saucepan, melt ½ tbsp. butter over low heat. Add the eggs and, using a wooden spatula, stir constantly, using a figure-eight motion, until the eggs start to get a little thick, about 5 minutes. Add 1 tbsp. cold butter and stir until melted. (This will stop the cooking and add extra creaminess to the eggs.)

 

 

Technique Tuesday: Segment Your Citrus

Written on January 28, 2014 at 9:00 am , by

Lately, we’ve been giving you lots of reasons to enjoy a nice, juicy orange, lemon or grapefruit (it is citrus season, after all). But how do we make those fruit segments look so darn beautiful? You, too, can upgrade your fruit salads, cocktails and desserts by cutting your oranges and grapefruits into pretty segments (“supremes” in chef lingo). Here’s how:

 

1. Prep It

Cut a small slice off the top and bottom, exposing some of the flesh. Stand the fruit up on one flat side.

 

2. Pare It

Cut from top to bottom along the curve of the fruit, removing the peel and bitter white pith.

 

3. Section It

Over a bowl, make a slice on each side of each segment along the membrane and use the knife blade to life out the freed fruit wedge.

 

4. Use It

in tons of delicious recipes, like the ones below!

 

Orange and Ice Cream Trifles

Tarragon Grapefruit Salad

Related Links

thirsty thursday: citrus season

thirsty for some shandy?

healthy holiday lunch with top chef richard blais

Fast Idea Friday: Cool it, Quick!

Written on January 3, 2014 at 9:00 am , by

To make a light, fluffy grain salad, you need cooled cooked grains. But letting them chill out in the pot or strainer will leave you with a clumpy, gummy mess. The solution is as close as your cupboard. Grab a baking sheet and save your salad this way:

 

1. Transfer drained, just-cooked grains to a rimmed baking sheet.

2. Using a spatula, spread the grains in an even layer. Let cool completely, about 30 minutes for 4 cups of grains. (For even quicker cooling, stick the pan in the refrigerator; it’ll take half the time.)

3. Use the cooled grains in all sorts of salads and side dishes, like our brand new Spinach Salad with Beets, Quinoa & Goat Cheese.

 

 

More quinoa recipes…

Green and Gold Quinoa Salad

Hearty Winter Veggie Pilaf

 

Related Links

Quinoa Recipes

Whole-Grain Dinners for a Deal

Snacks in a Snap

Technique Time: Whip It Good

Written on May 7, 2013 at 12:00 pm , by

Red Velvet Meltcakes Recipe When a recipe like our Red Velvet Meltcakes (pictured left) calls for beating heavy cream or egg whites, it will often mention soft or stiff peaks. How do you tell what’s what? You can see where you stand by just lifting up the beaters.

 

  • Soft Peaks will be thick but still droopy and are perfect for dollop-friendly whipped cream.
  • Stiff Peaks will stick up straight from the beaters and are what you’re looking for when making meringue.
Technique-Whipping Soft and Stiff Peaks

Illustration: Claudia Pearson

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How to Segment an Orange